piBlawg

the personal injury and clinical negligence blog

A collaboration between Rebmark Legal Solutions and 1 Chancery Lane

Applicable Law in Tort under Rome II and English Case Management Decisions

 

 

It’s one of the oldest chestnuts in private international law and has been brought into sharper focus by the Rome II Regulation on applicable law in tort. Assume that the English Claimant is catastrophically injured in a road traffic accident in France. The Claimant sues the tortfeasor’s French insurer in the English Courts (in line with his right to do so under section 3 of the Brussels I Regulation and the Odenbreit (2007) decision of the ECJ). Liability is not in issue and it is agreed that, by reason of Articles 4 and 15 of Rome II, French law will apply to the assessment of the Claimant’s damages. The Claimant wishes to rely on a panel of English experts (medico-legal and non-medical) of the kind usually instructed in catastrophic injury claims case managed and tried in this jurisdiction. The Defendant insurer, by contrast, wishes to restrict the Claimant to the sort of expertise that a French Court would rely upon (usually, one principal expert and a very limited number of additional experts). The Defendant’s argument is that the English Court – required to assess damages on a French law basis – needs, so far as possible, to adopt and replicate the approach that would be taken by a French Court. The Claimant argues that the selection and instruction of expert witnesses is a matter reserved to the law of the forum (English law) by reason of Article 1.3 of Rome II. An issue of just this kind arose in the very recent decision of Tugendhat J in Wall v Mutuelle de Poitiers Assurances [2013] QB 53 (QB). The following preliminary issue was tried, “Does the issue of which expert evidence the court should order fall to be determined: (a) By reference to the law of the forum (English Law) on the basis that this is an issue of ‘evidence and procedure’ within Article 1.3 of Rome II; or (b) By reference to the applicable law (French law) on the basis that this is an issue falling within Article 15 of Rome II?” The academic writing on this issue was somewhat mixed and inconclusive. However, Tugendhat J resolved the preliminary issue – thought to be the first time this question had been tried in this jurisdiction – by accepting the Claimant’s argument: the instruction of experts is a matter of evidence and procedure and, therefore, a matter for the law of the forum (English law). There is an application by the French insurer for permission to appeal.

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