piBlawg

the personal injury and clinical negligence blog

A collaboration between Rebmark Legal Solutions and 1 Chancery Lane

RTA Fraudsters Beware!

As I expect many will agree, there has been a recent upsurge in the past 12 or so months in cases of alleged fraudulent accidents coming before the courts. Are these sorts of accidents becoming more common? Or are insurer’s simply getting tougher and more bullish in alleging fraud? I think the answer is possibly “both”. There are some typical hallmarks of these sorts of fraud which can often be easily observed on a reading of the papers. Further research into a party’s (and often their relatives’) claim history can be very illuminating.

 

But of course such fraudulent claimants should be aware, it seems that the High Court also wishes to send a message out to them that they too are getting tougher on ‘this sort of thing’.

 

 

The Administrative Court (Sir John Thomas and Silber J) gave judgment yesterday in Liverpool Victoria Insurance Company Limited v Bashir & Ors. This case was a fairly standard sort of fraudulent motor insurance claim – a contrived accident between parties (a husband and wife inviting the involvement of acquaintances) who agreed to share any profits from the multiple claims for personal injuries and special damage. What was slightly more unusual in this case (and from some experience, I stress the “slightly”) was that the parties were prepared to involve their two children, one of whom was only 4 months old.

 

What perhaps is genuinely more unusual is that in the course of the proceedings, the Respondents admitted the claim was fraudulent.

 

In a move which could only be welcomed by insurers, the court held that it had no option but to impose an immediate custodial sentence upon the fraudulent (adult) parties, in the interests of the public at large and in deterring such conduct in the future. The court would have imposed a sentence well in excess of 12 months but took into account the fact that the Respondents’ admitted the fraud, and that the husband and wife assisted Liverpool Victoria with the disclosure of documents. On these Respondents, the court imposed a sentence of 6 weeks imprisonment. On the other Respondents the same sentence was imposed, but was however suspended to reflect the fact that the husband and wife had induced them into being involved.

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