piBlawg

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“Safe sex?”

The New Year will hopefully bring with it important news from Australia for employees everywhere - particularly those having sex in hotels!

 

It has long been the law that an employee who is negligently injured in the course of employment is generally entitled to look to his or her employer for compensation.
 
However, in a case which is currently awaiting the delivery of a reserved judgment in the Federal Court of Australia, the time, place and conditions under which an “on-the-job” accident occurs has been the subject of anxious judicial scrutiny.
 
The Claimant, a female public servant, sued the Australian federal government after being injured while having sex on a work trip in a hotel bedroom. A glass light fitting came away from the wall above the bed as she was having sex striking her in the face and causing injuries to her nose, mouth and a tooth as well as “a consequent psychiatric injury” described as an adjustment disorder.
 
The Claimant’s partner’s evidence was that they were “going hard” and that he did not know “if we bumped the light or it just fell off”.  He added, not unreasonably, that he was “not paying attention because we were rolling around”.
 
The Claimant claimed compensation because her injuries were caused “during the course of her employment” as she had been instructed to travel to and spend the night in the hotel in a small town in New South Wales ahead of a departmental meeting early the next day.  
 
ComCare, the Australian government's workplace safety body, rejected the claim on the grounds that sexual activity “was not an ordinary incident of an overnight stay like showering, sleeping or eating”. That decision was upheld by the Administrative Appeals Tribunal.
 
However, on appeal to the Federal Court, the Claimant’s counsel submitted that the accident was in truth “no different than slipping over in the shower”. In addition, “lawful sexual activity” should now be considered reasonable behaviour in a hotel room by an employee as “it's not the 1920s”.
 
Counsel for ComCare responded that people need to eat, sleep and attend to their personal hygiene but “you don't need to have sex”
 
The judge, Justice Nicholas, has reserved his judgment describing the case as “by no means easy”.
 
The judge is right to be cautious. Claims by employees have succeeded in the past when injuries have occurred in the course of employment related recreational activities involving drinking and socialising where negligence has been made out. It can be argued that being injured whilst having sex is no different provided that the injury occurred within an overall period or episode of work and negligence can be shown. Would the position be any different if, for example, the hotel had a gym and the Claimant had been negligently injured whilst working out on one of the hotel’s exercise bicycles or cross trainers?
 
The judgment may also provide useful guidance as to whether, at least in Australia, sexual activity should now be regarded by the prudent employer as a reasonably foreseeable part of an overnight stay in a hotel by an employee. If so, this will give a whole new meaning to the expression safe sex.
 

Comments (1) -

  • steve

    1/17/2012 10:20:17 AM |

    thanks for this

Comments are closed