piBlawg

the personal injury and clinical negligence blog

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EXPERTS: BUY ONE GET ONE FREE?

In an earlier post on piBlawg – “An End to Expert Shopping” – Thomas Crockett discussed the likely impact of Edwards-Tubb v JD Wetherspoon PLC [2011] EWCA Civ 136.

  

In Edwards-Tubb it was held that a claimant who obtains a medical report from an expert (A), but chooses, for whatever reason, not to rely on it and applies, instead, for permission to rely on another expert in the same field (B), the court has a discretionary power under CPR 35.4 to require him to disclose A’s report as a condition for the grant of permission to rely on B (see Hughes LJ, at paragraph 31 of the judgment). 

  

In the very recent case of Burnett v Discover the World (14.10.11), Teare J, sitting in the Admiralty Court, had to consider the meaning of “in the same field”. In Burnett, A was a neurologist and B was a neuropsychologist. The Claimant had suffered a head injury. He disclosed only the report of B, although stated in correspondence that he also had a report from A. The Defendant wanted to see A’s report. The Claimant opposed this on the grounds that A’s report was privileged and that A and B worked in different fields of medicine. Accordingly, it was argued that the disclosure sought by the Defendant fell outside the scope of the approach taken by the Court of Appeal in Edwards-Tubb.

 

On the face of it, the two experts worked in different medical fields: neurology is generally concerned with objective nervous system pathology, particularly of the brain. By contrast, neuropsychology is principally concerned with psychological conditions which may or may not originate in the neuropathology. It was submitted for the claimant that B’s report had only been commissioned on A’s express recommendation (presumably on the basis that B would consider matters that were outside the scope of A’s expertise). Teare J held that “the same field” (where used by the Court of Appeal in Edwards-Tubb) required a wide construction. The court was concerned with examining the nature and extent of the injuries alleged and the symptoms attributable to the same. Where A and B are attempting to investigate substantially the same symptoms, both reports will be of assistance to the court, notwithstanding that the experts have subtly different expertise or methodologies. Requiring a litigant to disclose an earlier expert’s report is the price for the permission to rely on another. The choice, therefore, lies with the litigant. As such, the approach taken in Edwards-Tubb contemplates the waiver of privilege as to the earlier report as the condition for the grant of the Court’s permission to rely on the subsequent expert; it maximises the information available to the court and discourages “expert shopping”.

It is clear that in many cases litigants have attempted to obtain more favourable evidence yet side step the rule in Edwards-Tubb by approaching experts with similar expertise, but from slightly different scientific/medical disciplines. This ruling may close off this escape route. It suggests that the court will look to the symptoms in question in order to see whether A and B are in, in substance “in the same field”.

 

Case note prepared with the assistance of Thomas Collins, Pupil Barrister.

 

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