piBlawg

the personal injury and clinical negligence blog

A collaboration between Rebmark Legal Solutions and 1 Chancery Lane

Have we started yet? Commencement of contested hearing and CFA uplifts

When a trial begins is of obvious import to any litigant where one or more party is funded by a conditional fee agreement which provides for an uplift per CPR 45.16 and 45.17. Mrs Justice Slade in a recent appeal from Master Campbell held that a contested hearing on the issue of liability had yet to commence before a subsequent settlement.   The facts of James v Ireland [2015] EWHC 1259 (QB) are unusual but not exceptional.   On the first day of a three day trial of a personal injuries case, the claimant successfully applied for an adjournment of the issue of quantum, it being intended that the issue of liability would proceed. Unusually however, late evidence disclosed by the defendant that hitherto unidentified independent witness. To allow for a statement to be taken from the same by the claimant, the matter was adjourned to the following day. The judge asked counsel what to read overnight. The next day it was revealed that attempts to contact the elusive independent witness had been unsuccessful. Nevertheless, the case was adjourned to the afternoon so that attempts could continue. These attempts were also fruitless, however given the likely importance of the witness the case was stood out. The judge reserved the matter to himself for a hearing at a later date. This hearing never took place as the claim was settled.   Had the liability trial commenced? The master held that it had. Counsel had entered court. Reading had commenced. Submissions had been provided and considered as to the adjournments. Thus, it was held that the claimant was entitled to the 100 percent costs uplift.   The defendant appealed, arguing that the master erred by failing to hold that nothing in the heard proceedings constituted a core event, such as would indicate that the liability trial had begun (Cutler v Stephenson and Manchester City Council [2008] EWHC 3622 (QB); Gandy v King [2010] EWHC 90177 (Costs)). It was further submitted that the judge would have held that the case was part heard had he considered the trial to have begun, rather than ordered it to be relisted reserved to himself. The claimant argued that the trial had begun as the judge had done pre-reading and that the submissions on the quantum aspect of the case would not have required further elucidation to open as to liability.   The Defendant’s submissions found favour with Mrs Justice Slade who held that a final contested hearing of the liability issue was not triggered by the commencement of any hearing of any nature related to the same. The hearing which was commenced was akin to a case management hearing, as the same did not consider any aspect necessary to determine the question of liability. The reading undertaken by the judge was held to have been prudent use of court time rather than a substantive consideration of a core issue. She held further that the transcripts actually supported the contention that the judge was unaware of the scope of the main issues of the case as to liability when the matter was stood out.

Personal Injury and the Party Manifestos

Is there anything in the parties' manifestos which might affect the field of personal injury? Reforms since 2010 include a new fixed costs regime, costs management/budgeting and greatly increased court fees. Civil liability has been removed for breaches of health and safety regulations. But what is being promised for the future? The Conservative Manifesto includes a pledge to reform human rights law. It would scrap the Human Rights Act and introduce a British Bill of Rights. The intention is that this will break the formal link between British Courts and the European Court of Human Rights making the Supreme Court the ultimate arbiter of human rights matters in the UK.  More is said in the section on the European Union: the Bill will remain faithful to the basic principles of human rights but “will reverse the mission creep that has meant human rights law being used for more and more purposes, and often with little regard for the rights of wider society.” The manifesto also pledges to continue “the £375 million modernisation of our courts system, reducing delay and frustration for the public.” A commitment is also made for an ongoing review of legal aid. The Labour Manifesto takes the opposite view on the Human Rights Act. It states that Labour would protect it and reform rather than walk away from the European Court of Human Rights. The manifesto is silent on what that reform would be. The manifesto also includes a pledge that access to legal representation would not be determined by personal wealth but would remain available to those who need it. The Liberal Democrat Manifesto states that the Liberal Democrats would protect the Human Rights Act and enshrine the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child in UK Law. It specifically states that the Liberal Democrats would take “appropriate action to comply with decisions of the UK courts and the European Court of Human Rights.” The Liberal Democrats have a commitment to introduce a Freedoms Act which would “cut back on the petty over-regulation of everyday life… permitting swimming in open bodies of water.” (Tomlinson v Congleton springs to mind…). They would “carry out an immediate review of civil Legal Aid… and court fees, in consultation with the judiciary…” They would “reverse any recent rises in up-front court fees that make justice unaffordable for many, and instead” spread the fee burden more fairly. They would also retain access to recoverable success fees and insurance premiums in asbestosis claims and where an individual is suing the police. There is also a pledge to support innovation like the provision of “civil justice online” and expansion of ADR. The UKIP Manifesto states that the burden of complying with EU laws on health and safety can be overwhelming for small firms. The manifesto has a commitment to repeal EU Regulations which stifle business growth. As to human rights, UKIP would remove the UK from the jurisdiction of the European Court of Human Rights and make the UK’s Supreme Court the final authority on matters of human rights. It would repeal the Human Rights Act and introduce a UK Bill of Rights which would complement the UN Declaration of Human Rights and “encapsulate all the human and civil rights that UK citizens have acquired under UK law since Magna Carta.” The Green Manifesto states it will “move towards a written constitution with a Bill of Rights” it also has a commitment to keeping the Human Rights Act and retaining the UK’s membership of the ECHR. There is a pledge to “restore the cuts to Legal Aid, costing around £700 million a year” although it is not clear whether this has anything to do with personal injury. It is interesting that none of the political parties have a commitment to reinstate civil liability for breach of health and safety regulations made under the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974.   Trivia Comparative lengths of the manifestos: Conservatives:                 84 pages Labour:                            86 pages Liberal Democrats:          158 pages UKIP:                              76 pages Green:                              84 pages   Commitment requiring more explanation: “Ban high-frequency Mosquito devices which discriminate against young people.” (Liberal Democrats)

After pasties and caravans … CFAs and DBAs?

Is it just me or should we all be concerned about the way in which the legislation to implement Lord Justice Jackson’s recommendations is being introduced?   Why have there been so few announcements about what are, after all, radical and far reaching public policy changes? If we as legal professionals are unsure about the proposed changes, how can we properly advise the public after 1 April 2013?   Will legal professionals soon be joining bakers and caravanning enthusiasts in pointing out to the government the potential far reaching consequences of over hasty legislation?   In the foreword to his final report on costs in civil litigation dated 21 December 2009 Lord Justice Jackson wrote:   “ … I therefore propose a coherent package of interlocking reforms, designed to control costs and promote access to justice ...”   He went on to make a total of 109 separate recommendations some but not all of which have found their way into proposed new legislation. In particular the Conditional Fee Agreements Order 2013 (the CFA Order) and the Damages-based Agreements Regulations 2013 (the DBA Regulations) have now been laid before Parliament and were subject to a Motion to Approve debate in the House of Lords on 26 February 2013.   Both have been described by the General Council for the Bar (GCB) as “not fit for purpose”. The GCB also suggested that the proposed order and regulations “will deny access to justice, burden the courts’ time with unnecessary satellite litigation and limit the commercial use of DBAs”.    There are certainly grounds for concern. As we all know, the success fee under a CFA entered into after 1 April 2013 for proceedings at first instance will be capped at 25%. Article 5(2) of the proposed CFA Order provides that this will be 25% of “(a) general damages for pain, suffering, and loss of amenity; and (b) damages for pecuniary loss, other than future pecuniary loss” (my emphasis). However, in a lecture given on 29 February 2012, Lord Justice Jackson amended his view in response to submissions from a number of parties and proposed that the cap should be 25% of all damages. There must be a risk that in larger and more complicated cases which are difficult to cost budget and involve significant initial disbursements, limiting the cap to 25% of past losses will not promote “access to justice” as Lord Justice Jackson hoped but may in fact prove to be a disincentive to  taking on such cases in the first place.   Then there is VAT. As drafted, the proposed CFA Order provides that the “damages” to which the 25% cap applies are “net of any sums recoverable by the Compensation Recovery Unit of the Department for Work and Pensions”. There is no exclusion for VAT. But if VAT is included in such damages there is not only scope for uncertainty (what happens, for example, if the VAT rate changes after the CFA has been entered into but before a bill of costs is rendered?) but in the larger and more complicated cases this may be a further reason why those contemplating taking on such cases may decline to do so on the grounds that the unpredictability of the risk will not be properly compensated by the level of the CFA.   The same objections apply to the proposed DBA Regulations. As presently drafted, the cap for DBAs is inclusive of VAT but exclusive of damages for future pecuniary loss. In addition, the DBA Regulations do not allow for “hybrid” agreements i.e. agreements under which some costs are recoverable if a “win” does not occur rather than no costs at all. This is again contrary to what Lord Justice Jackson recommended and may prove a disincentive to the use of DBAs particularly in commercial cases.   Access to justice may not be as newsworthy as Cornish pasties and static caravans but in resource-intensive cases, the government’s aim of protecting the damages recoverable by claimants may actually result in some claimants being unable to obtain legal representation and thus recovering no damages at all.       Image – cornishpasties.com

Post Jackson CPR Amendments published – a brave new world?

The Civil Procedure Rule Committee has published CPR amendments due to come into force on 1st April 2013. Some of the key provisions for PI practitioners are as follows:- Amendment to the Overriding Objective The overriding objective will become not just “to deal with cases justly” but also “at proportionate cost”; and the definition of “dealing with a case justly” will now include “enforcing compliance with rules, practice directions and orders”. This puts both costs and compliance with directions right at the heart of the Rules – with these changes it will become more difficult to point a judge to the overriding objective when asking him or her to overlook a breach of the rules. Relief from Sanctions Talking about breaches or rules and court orders, CPR 3.9 is to be revised taking out the familiar checklist. Instead, the court will consider all the circumstances, including specifically the need for litigation to be conducted efficiently and at proportionate cost, and the need to enforce compliance with rules, practice directions and court orders. As above, this does represent a significant shift in approach. Costs Management The amendments will introduce a comprehensive set of rules on cost management for multi-track cases, including costs budgets. These merit detailed consideration. There are some sanctions in the event that these rules are not complied with – for example, failure to file a costs budget will mean the litigant is treated as having filed a budget comprising only the applicable court fees (unless the court orders otherwise – see above). Increased Small Claims Track limit The Small Claims Track limit is raised to £10,000: but low value personal injury claims for general damages over £1,000 will continue to be Fast Track cases. The current rules regarding harassment; unlawful eviction relating to residential premises; and disrepair will remain. New Provisions relating to Disclosure These will include a requirement for parties to discuss and seek to agree a proposal in relation to disclosure meeting the overriding objective. Bonus for Claimants beating Part 36 offers In addition to interest on damages; costs on the indemnity basis; and interest on those costs, Claimants who beat their own Part 36 offers will be entitled to an “additional amount”, 10% of the sum awarded to the Claimant (where the claim is a money claim) up to £500,000 and 5% of the sum above that, up to a maximum £75,000. For non-money claims, the bonus applies to the sum awarded to the Claimant in respect of costs. Costs CPR 43 is revoked, and Parts 44 – 48 are replaced in full. That’s to say, all the existing sections of the CPR relating to costs are to be changed. Below are some of the key points from the new provisions:- Assessment of Costs When assessing costs, the court will “only allow costs which are proportionate to the matters in issue”. Costs that are disproportionate may be disallowed even if they were reasonably or necessarily incurred. Costs are proportionate if they bear a “reasonable relationship” to the sums in issue; the value of non-monetary relief; the complexity of the litigation; additional work caused by the paying party’s conduct; any wider factors such as reputation or public importance. This rule only applies to cases commenced after 1st April 2013. Qualified One-Way Costs Shifting This applies in personal injuries and Fatal Accident claims. It does not apply to pre-action disclosure. There is no means test: this is of general application. Qualified one-way costs shifting means that costs orders may be enforced against a claimant only to the extent that the aggregate sum of such orders does not exceed the aggregate sum of damages and interest made in favour of the Claimant. In practice, this will work as follows:-   a) Where a claim is dismissed, the Claimant receives no damages or interest. A costs order will be made in the Defendant's favour, but the Defendant will not be able to enforce the costs order against the Claimant to any extent.   b) The Claimant recovers damages, but fails to beat the Defendant's Part 36 offer. A costs order will be made in the Defendant's favour pursuant to Part 36. But this can only be enforced up to the total of the damages and interest payable to the Claimant. So if the Claimant is awarded £20,000 damages and interest, this figure provides a cap on the costs that can be enforced against the Claimant.   c) Interim costs orders have been made in the Defendant's favour, but the Claimant untimately succeeds. As above, the Defendant will be able to enforce its costs orders, but only up to the total of the Claimant's damages and interest. There are some exceptions, though:- Where proceedings have been struck out on the basis that a) they disclose no reasonable grounds for bringing the proceedings; b) the proceedings are an abuse of process; or c) where the Claimant’s conduct is likely to obstruct the just disposal of proceedings, there is no qualified one-way costs shifting. Where the claim has been found to be “fundamentally dishonest” the court may grant permission for the Defendant fully to enforce the costs order. Claimant’s Costs where there is a Damages-Based Agreement The Court will make the same costs order in the Claimant’s favour as if there were no damages-based agreement.

Claims and Counterclaims: RTA uplifts and settling on the day of trial

Slade J handed down judgment this week in an appeal concerning the question of whether the claimant's legal representatives were entitled to a 100% uplift on their costs, in accordance with the fixed uplift regime for conditional fee agreements in road traffic cases, where the case settled on the day of trial, but before the trial commenced.  She also addressed the vexed question of whether the difference in wording between CPR 45.16 and 45.17 means that solicitor's and counsel's uplifts should be treated differently. In Amin (1) Hussain (2) v Mullings (1) Royal Sun Alliance (2) [2011] EWHC 278 (QB) the facts were typical.  The first claimant (A) was involved in an accident with the first defendant (M) when driving the second claimant's car (H).  A and M blamed each other for the accident.  A brought a claim against M and M counter claimed.  One month before trial the quantum of A's claim was agreed, subject to liability.  By the time the matter was heard by the Recorder on the day of trial the parties had agreed to a 50:50 division of liability and all of M's counterclaim was agreed save for the amount he was entitled to for hire of an alternative vehicle, the only issue which the Recorder was asked to determine.  The Recorder ordered each party to pay the costs of the other of pursuing their claim and awarded each party a 100% uplift on the ground that both the claim and the counterclaim had concluded "at trial" within the meaning of CPR 45.15 and therefore both solicitor and counsel for A were entitled to 100% uplifts on their costs under CPR 45.16 and 45.17.  He gave judgment that "at trial" must include the date or time the trial is fixed to take place and include negotiations that take place on the day of trial to settle the claim or narrow the issues before the hearing commences.  It was submitted on behalf of M and M's insurer that the Recorder had erred in failing to distinguish between the hearing of the counterclaim, which related to the trial of M's claim and A's claim, which was wholly compromised before the hearinng commenced. Slade J held that the Recorder erred in concluding that "at trial" is not defined in CPR 45.  She said "it is clear from CPR 45.15(6)(b) that "at trial" means at a contested hearing.  As is clear from CPR 45.17(1)(a) and (b)(i) the rules recognise a distinction between a trial and the date fixed for the commencement of the trial.  Further, the rules recognise a distinction between the conclusion of a claim after and before a trial has commenced.  Settlement before a trial commences and conclusion by settlement after a trial commencese could both occur on the date fixed for the trial.  The trigger for entitlement to a 100% uplift in fees is  not a settlement on a particular date but a settlement or conclusion after a trial, defined as a hearing, has commenced." Slade J was went on to consider whether there should be any difference in the way solicitor's and counsel's uplifts should be approached arising out of differences in the wording of CPR 45.16 and CPR 45.17.  She considered two conflicting decisions concerning counsel's uplift under CPR 45.17 when a case settles on the day of trial but before the hearing commences.  She approved the decision in Sitapuria v Khan, an unreported decisoin of the Liverpool County Court on 10 December 2007 and declined to follow the decision in Dahele v Thomas Bates & Son Ltd an unreported decision of the Supreme Court Costs Office of April 17 2007.  She held that the meaning of CPR r.45.16 was clear. Its language was not to be given a different meaning to accord with a construction of r.45.17 in order to deal with a perceived lacuna in r.45.17 in relation to the uplift in counsel's fees, as had been done in Dahele.   This is an important decision to be aware of because is addresses two commonly encountered issues.  First, Slade J grapples with the knotty problem of uplifts for both parties where there is a claim and counterclaim but only part of one of the claims remains outstanding at the commencement of the hearing.  Secondly, she considers the difficulty of the competing decisions in Sitapuria and Dahele, both first instance decisions that are no more than persuasive and provides helpful guidance on the interpretation of CPR r 45.16(1) and CPR r 45.17(1), bearing in mind the differences in their wording.  The correct uplift to solicitor's fees where the claim settled before commmencement of the hearing, regardless of whether it was on the day of trial, was 12.5 per cent.  She then went on to say that the language of r.45.17(1)(a) was the same as that of r.45.16(1)(a).  There was no reason to distinguish it from the clear meaning of that provision.  If there were any doubt about the construction of r.45.17(1)(a), in the absence of any basis for ascribing a different meaning to the words "the claim concludes at trial", they should be construed consistently with their clear meaning in r.45.16(1)(a).  Although the proper construction of r.45.17(1) as it applied to the conclusion of claims on the day fixed for trial but before trial commenced was not immediately apparent, there was no lacuna in the rule.  On its proper construction such a settlement gave rise to an entitlement to an uplift in counsel's fees of 50 per cent in a fast track road traffic claim.