piBlawg

the personal injury and clinical negligence blog

A collaboration between Rebmark Legal Solutions and 1 Chancery Lane

Records of Inquest: the conclusion is... use your boxes correctly and keep it succinct

For those of you practising in coronial law, the Chief Coroner's Guidance No. 17 was published on 30 January 2015. It contains some useful and succinct guidance on short form conclusions and narrative conclusions, including: how and when they should be used (as alternatives or together); the correct approach to the three stages of the conclusion (i.e. fact finding, box 3 of the Record of Inquest and box 4 of the Record of Inquest); standards of proof; and a summary of the 'ingredients' of the common short form conclusions. The guidance is by no means a full and comprehensive review of the law, but it certainly provides clarity and is likely to be a useful reference when dealing with submissions on conclusions.   The guidance can be downloaded at http://judiciary.go.uk/related-offices-and-bodies/office-chief-coroner/guidance-law-sheets/coroners-guidance/ 

Schedules, Counter Schedules and the Gadget Generation

    No self-respecting Schedule of Loss is now complete without a hefty claim for “Assistive Technology” items. The response in most Counter Schedules is that the Claimant is likely to have possessed all or some of the items being claimed in any event. The fact is that UK parents now spend a combined £2.25 billion a year or just under £300 per year per household on technology for their children.   This information comes from research on behalf of E.ON UK, one of the UK’s large energy providers.   http://pressreleases.eon-uk.com/blogs/eonukpressreleases/archive/2014/07/25/2376.aspx   We are truly the “gadget generation” in that today’s children possess an average of 4 gadgets each.   Staggeringly, parents with children aged under 5 spend even more. On average a “techie tot” is given gadgets costing £395 per year. Not surprisingly, it is teenagers aged 15-17 who are the most “plugged-in” typically owning 7 devices each.   The trend continues into adulthood. From age 18, parents of males spend over £717 a year on gadgets for their sons. Females aged 18 and over have just under £1,000 worth of gadgets bought for them by their parents per year.   It will come as no surprise to readers not in these age groups to learn that most (56%) of parents acknowledge using their children's “technology hand-me-downs”. 32% of parents also confessed to not being as “tech-savvy” as their children. Most worryingly of all, 14% of parents admitted that they could not even match their “techie tots” when it comes to knowing their way around the latest gadgets.   Perhaps the Counters Schedulers have a point?

Delaney v Secretary of State for Transport - the “crime exception" is contrary to EU law

The High Court has held that the “crime exception", contained in clause 6(1)(e)(iii) of the Uninsured Drivers' Agreement 1999, is in breach of the United Kingdom's obligations under the EU Motor Insurance Directives and that the claimant is entitled to Francovich damages as a result therof ([2014] EWHC 1785 (QB); see www.bailii.org/ew/cases/EWHC/QB/2014/1785.html).   Given the widespread implications for both insurers and the State, it is likely this decision will be subject to appeal.