piBlawg

the personal injury and clinical negligence blog

A collaboration between Rebmark Legal Solutions and 1 Chancery Lane

Are counsel’s doodles privileged?

    Do you doodle in meetings? Should you doodle in meetings?   There is both good news and bad.       The good news is that doodling may be good for you! A study by the University of Plymouth and published in Applied Cognitive Psychology suggests that doodling actually helps improve concentration and memory. Two groups of people were asked to listen to a boring telephone conversation. One group was doodling, the other was not. The doodlers remembered 29 per cent more information than those who had simply sat and listened.   The bad news at least so far as counsel is concerned is that any doodles may now have a wider audience than the doodler may have intended. In Hellard and another v Irwin Mitchell [2012] All ER (D) 71; [2012] EWHC 2656 (Ch) His Honour Judge Purle Q.C. sitting as a judge of the Chancery Division heard an application in a claim for alleged professional negligence against the defendant firm of solicitors.       The essential issue was limitation and, in particular, whether it was reasonable for the solicitors to rely on the advice of counsel and what counsel's advice had been. The solicitors applied for a declaration that the claimant trustee in bankruptcy had impliedly waived the obligations of the bankrupt’s former counsel to uphold legal professional privilege in respect of the subject matter of the claim.       It was common ground that the bringing of the claim had operated as a waiver of privilege with regard to the solicitors’ file including the solicitors’ notes of conferences with counsel and the deliberations of the solicitor including deliberations with counsel. The issue was whether privilege still attached to counsel’s own papers such as working papers and notes of conferences because counsel had not been joined in the claim.       The court held that privilege attached to confidential communications between the solicitors, counsel and their mutual client. Once privilege regarding those communications had been waived, any evidence as to those communications could be adduced - see [9], [12], [15] of the judgment.       Thus having waived privilege in relation to counsel's advice, the claimant could not pick and choose which bits of counsel's advice or deliberations could be withheld from the court. The waiver would therefore extend to all of counsel’s own working papers, deliberations and notes including, presumably, any doodles!       Despite the results of the Plymouth study, it seems that doodling does not always help with concentration and memory. One individual is quoted as saying:   “I always doodle, and I don't pay attention … It kind of hurts my memory”.   

Vicarious Liability for Sex Abusers: Catholic Child Welfare Society v Various Claimants (1) The Institute of Christian Brothers (2)

Just this morning, the Supreme Court has given judgment in the historic child abuse case of Catholic Child Welfare Society v Various Claimants (1) The Institute of Christian Brothers (2) [2012] UKSC 56. A fuller report will appear on the PiBlawg, no doubt in due course.     Lord Phillips, giving the sole judgement of the Court held that there are two stages in establishing vicarious liability: (a)    first whether the relationship between the abuser and the defendant was capable of giving rise to vicarious liability; and (b)   secondly examination of the connection that linked the relationship between them and the abuser’s wrongful conduct. Applying this test, the Institute, an unincorporated association, was vicariously liable for the acts of abuse committed by its members who worked in a school under a contract of employment with a third party.   This case may be of inadvertent pertinence in the coming years in light of what the Press suggest it likely to be a veritable avalanche of civil claims brought by victims of child abuse, brought in the wake of the allegations made against Jimmy Savile and others working at the BBC and other institutions. The nature of the employment is likely to be of paramount importance in such cases, especially in those where the alleged abuser is deceased and/or impecunious.   Lord Faulks QC and Alistair Hammerton of 1 Chancery Lane appeared for the Second Respondents.  

Delayed flight claims: Clear for takeoff (2/2)

The ECJ dealt a hammer blow to European airlines this morning in the long-awaited joined cases of TUI and Nelson (Cases C-581/10 and C-629/10). The full text will be available shortly but judging by the press summary, the Court has adopted almost verbatim the Opinion of Advocate General Bot.  This case confirms the decision in Sturgeon (Case C-402/07) that where an air carrier operates or intends to operate a flight either departing from or landing in a EU member state, and that flight is subject to a ‘long delay’ (meaning a delay of three hours or more), each passenger will be entitled to compensation on the following basis: EUR 250 for all flights of 1,500km or less; EUR 400 for all intra-Community flights of more than 1,500km and for all other flights between 1,500km and 3,500km; and EUR 600 for all flights not falling under (1) or (2) The Court confirmed that the temporal scope of its ruling is not limited to those passengers who issued proceedings before today’s judgment, and extends to any potential claim not already statute barred. This case clears the way for many thousands of claims that are currently stayed by court order or consent, to continue on to trial. It is anticipated that many fresh claims will also come forward. Airlines now face a potential liability running into the tens of thousands of pounds for each flight delayed by three hours or more. The ECJ did not however, regard this as a disproportional means of achieving the legitimate aims of the legislation, as long delays are rare (estimated at 1 in every200 scheduled flights) and in any event, airlines can rely on the defence that the delay or cancellation was caused by ‘extraordinary circumstances’.   Attention now turns to the ‘extraordinary circumstances’ defence; the new battleground in denied boarding litigation. Another consideration is how this new liability is to be paid for. Holidaymakers may find themselves paying more for their week in the sun as a result of the ECJ’s latest piece of teleological reasoning.

JURISDICTION, CONSUMER PROTECTION, CRUISING BY FREIGHTER AND A MOONLIGHT FLIT (FROM AN AUSTRIAN HOTEL)

     Peter Pammer sounds like the name of a character from a (badly written) sitcom, but is in fact the name of an Austrian with an eye for a bargain. While searching online for a cheap holiday, Mr Pammer alighted on the website of a German Company: Internationale Frachtschiffreisen Pfeiffer GmbH. This entity acted as an intermediary for the sale of an unlikely sounding voyage (a holiday of sorts) from Trieste to the Far East. The vessel which was to operate the voyage was an industrial freight ship. Sailing on such a ship might not obviously have conjured thoughts of reclining on a sun deck sipping gin and tonic, but the website did promise Mr Pammer (and anyone else who read it) an onboard fitness room, an outdoor swimming pool and a saloon, together with onboard video and television access. There was also a promise of double cabin accommodation with shower and toilet and a separate living room. The website further indicated that the freighter would make ports of call from which excursions ashore could be taken. Mr Pammer was sufficiently attracted by the website offer to enter into a contract for the voyage, but this was not with the intermediary company, but, instead, with another German corporate entity: Reederei Karl Schluter.             Mr Pammer apparently refused to embark on the freighter; perhaps predictably, it was his view that the conditions on board did not meet the description provided on the website. He had paid EUR 8,500 for the voyage and sought a refund. The German company – Reederei Karl Schluter – reimbursed only EUR 3,500 and Mr Pammer brought proceedings in the Austrian Court (viz. the Court of his nationality and domicile) for the balance: EUR 5,000. Reederei Karl Schluter contested jurisdiction on the ground that it did not pursue any professional or commercial activity in Austria and, accordingly, the Austrian Court lacked jurisdiction. At first instance, the Austrian Court declared that it had jurisdiction on the ground that the voyage contract was a consumer contract (for regulated “package” travel) and the intermediary company had, by internet advertisement, engaged in advertising activity in Austria. On appeal, Reederei Karl Schluter was successful on the ground that the index contract was a contract of carriage, rather than a consumer contract (the fact that the voyage afforded – or ought to have afforded – a degree of comfort to the passenger did not convert a contract of carriage into a consumer contract). Undaunted, Mr Pammer appealed to the Austrian Supreme Court which stayed proceedings and referred the following questions to the European Court of Justice Pammer v Reederei Karl Schluter GmbH & Co KG [2010] (European Court of Justice: C-585/08) “1. Does a voyage by freighter constitute package travel for the purposes of article 15(3) of Regulation No 44/2001? 2. If the answer to Question 1 is in the affirmative: is the fact that an intermediary’s website can be consulted on the internet sufficient to justify a finding that activities are being ‘directed’ to the Member State of the consumer’s domicile within the meaning of Article 15(1)(c) of Regulation No 44/2001?” Mr Pammer’s case highlights, perhaps, a phenomenon that is increasingly experienced by English consumers who are injured while enjoying – if that’s the right word – holidays overseas. They book a holiday by means of a website. The holiday is a not a regulated package (within the meaning of the Package Travel etc. Regulations 1992). The consumer is injured while using the services provided by his or her holiday accommodation and would like to bring proceedings in this respect in the English courts. The Hotel is owned/operated by a foreign company which provides an obvious impediment to English jurisdiction. If the website operator is also foreign owned/operated then that might seem to rule out any English proceedings unless it can be said that the contract is a consumer contract and that the website activity is directed to the Member State where the consumer is domiciled (England) within the meaning of article 15(1)(c) of the Judgments Regulation. The outcome of the reference to the ECJ in Pammer (joined with another case Hotel Alpenhof GesembH v Oliver Heller [2010] (C-144/09) which involved a consumer leaving a Hotel without payment), together with a more recent ECJ decision (Muhlleitner v Yusufi & anor. [2012] (European Court of Justice: C-190/11), now suggests that where the internet trader has manifested an intention to direct activity to a Member State other than that of its own domicile/registration then article 15(1)(c) will be satisfied and the English consumer injured overseas can nevertheless pursue a claim against the foreign internet trader in England. Such intention may be evidenced by the nature of the relevant trading activity (as found, for example, in tourism services), mention on the website of an international clientele or an itinerary comprising visits to Member States other than that in which the trader is resident or even simply the use of telephone numbers with an international code. The jurisdictional hurdle for the English consumer to jump is not a very high one. Internet holiday sales – whether or not the resultant contracts are “packages” – are now very common. Often, overseas bed-booking intermediaries will assert that a consumer’s contract is with the local (overseas) Hotelier or service supplier. In such cases, the Odenbreit decision and section 3 of the Judgments Regulation provides a potential jurisdictional route to a claim against the local supplier’s (foreign) insurer in the English Courts, but Pammer/Hotel Alpenhof/Muhlleitner now provide a potential basis for suing the tortfeasor service supplier itself in England – another useful weapon in the English consumer’s jurisdictional arsenal.

Quantifying Future Loss of Earnings: Ward v Allies & Morrison Architects [2012] EWCA Civ 1287

At the quantum only trial of a personal injuries matter, HHJ Cleary held that he did not have sufficient evidence pertaining to the claimant’s level of likely future earnings and the likely duration therof. Nor was he satisfied that the claimant was disabled. Accordinly, the trial judge made a lump sum award of £30,000 to allow the claimant to retrain following Blamire v South Cumbria HA [1993] P.I.Q.R. Q1, in addition to some £24,000 in general damages and £19,750 for past loss of earnings. The Claimant appealed on the contentions (amongst others) that the Judge should have used the Ogden tables to calculate lost future earnings (expected to quantify a loss of £176,633.46 on the basis that the Claimant expected to become a theatrical model maker) rather than have made a broad brush Blamire award.   The Court of Appeal (Aikens LJ, Kitchen LJ & Sir Richard Buxton) held that whilst the Ogden tables should be the usual method of quantifying such loss, this depended on the court’s ability to make findings of fact as to the likely earning capacity of a claimant, which the Judge in the instant case was unable to do. It was re-emphasised that it is for a claimant to prove their loss in this regard. In the instant case it was held that the judge was entitled to hold that there were too many imponderables to have allowed a firm finding as to the Claimant’s likely career progression and thus her future loss of earnings award. Thus the Judge was entitled to make a Blamire award.  

Should the solicitor pay up?

Can a solicitor be liable for costs if he or she takes on a case for an impecunious claimant under a CFA where there is no ATE insurance policy in place and where he or she funds the disbursements necessary to allow the case to proceed?   Neil Hamilton famously sued Mohammed Al-Fayed for defamation over ‘cash for questions’, lost and was ordered to pay £1.3m in costs. Mr Al-Fayed then pursued Mr Hamilton’s financial backers (not parties to the litigation) for costs, lost and was ordered to pay their costs. Unsurprisingly there has not been as much media attention and public interest in the case of Tinseltime v Eryl Roberts [2012] EWHC 2628 which was a case in the technology and construction court. There was no personal injury involved: the claimant claimed that the defendant had created dust whilst demolishing a building and the dust had damaged machinery and caused a loss of profit. The claim was unsuccessful and the claimant was ordered to pay the defendant’s costs. The defendants applied for an order under section 51(3) of the Senior Courts Act 1981 and/or CPR 48.2 that the claimant’s solicitor pay the costs as a non-party funder. The claimant’s solicitor had entered into a CFA. He had been unduly optimistic about how straightforward the issue of liability would be. It was clear that he was aware that if the claimant lost it would not be able to pay costs. He estimated the overall costs likely to be incurred to be £20,000 and disbursements, £10,000. In the event disbursements amounted to £22,270 and so burnt a sizeable hole in his pocket. He had expected to recover the disbursements from the defendant (if successful). The judge concluded that the following were the correct legal principles to apply. The first question was whether it just in all the circumstances to make an order. Secondly, when considering a solicitor, had he acted beyond or outside his role as a solicitor conducting litigation? Thirdly, the fact that a solicitor is acting under a CFA and stands to benefit financial from the outcome does not mean he has acted beyond or outside his role as a solicitor. Fourthly, the starting point is that the position of a solicitor funding disbursements is no different from one who is not as both positions are legitimate and meet a legitimate public policy aim. The judge was of the view that, in order to be successful in applying for a non-party costs order there would have to be present either some financial benefit to the solicitor over and above the benefit which he could expect to receive from the CFA or some exercise of control of the litigation over and above that which would be expected from a solicitor acting on behalf of a client (or a combination of both). By way of example the judge suggested that a solicitor’s desire to achieve a successful outcome might cause him to take over the running of the litigation for his own ends. Another example was of a case where the damages claimed were modest in comparison to costs incurred so that the client had lost interest in the proceedings but the solicitor was wedded to them in order to recover his costs. The circumstances of a case might justify the conclusion that a solicitor was making all the decisions for his own benefit. The defendants argued that the claimant’s solicitor had acted improperly, unreasonably or negligently in his conduct of the case. The judge said this was the province of wasted costs (which were not awarded - although pursued in the alternative). He said courts should be astute to keep wasted costs and non-party costs separate. The claimant’s solicitor may have misjudged the case but he came out of the judgment rather well. The judge commented that he was not motivated solely by financial self-interest but with the laudable aim of providing access to justice to the claimant. He thought the claim was genuine and had written a file note stating “the company has been crippled by the defendant tortfeasors and needs assistance.” The judgment draws to a close effectively with a warning against letting financial self-interest get the better of you and an encouragement from a judge to practitioners to be motivated not solely by financial self-interest but by a concern for justice and access to justice. Such a consideration (and file-note for the record!) might well prove worthwhile… Photograph courtesy of freefoto.com

Court of Appeal tightens up on relief from sanctions

Jackson LJ considered case management decisions in his report on costs in civil litigation. He said:-   "...courts at all levels have become too tolerant of delays and non-compliance with orders. In so doing they have lost sight of the damage which the culture of delay and non-compliance is inflicting on the civil justice system. The balance therefore needs to be redressed."  Earlier this year, in Fred Perry v Brands Plaza Trading Limited [EWCA] 2012 Civ 224, the Court of Appeal agreed and applied CPR 3.9 in a way which attempted to redress that balance.   The Defendant had been in breach of a series of orders. Unless orders had been made, the Defendant had not complied and the defence was struck out. The Defendant applied for relief from sanctions. The Court of Appeal reiterated that the interests of the administration of justice - the first item on the CPR 3.9 checklist - requires that parties comply with court orders, and particularly so where the order in question is an Unless order. This is a welcome reminder that the interests of the administration of justice are not necessarily the same as the interests of justice.   The Court of Appeal was critical of the Defendant’s attempt to argue that the Unless should not have been made or was too onerous. It was inappropriate to make a collateral attack on the order in an application for relief from sanctions: if the Defendant did not like the order its remedy was to appeal, which it had not done. The judgment emphasised that the first instance judge has a wide discretion when considering an application for relief from sanctions. The Court of Appeal approved of the judge’s exercise of discretion, and noted that judges who made robust but fair case management decisions should be supported. Lord Justice Jackson was on the panel and made the further point that CPR 3.9 is due to change with effect from 1st April 2013. The familiar checklist is due to be replaced with the following:- "On an application for relief from any sanction imposed for a failure to comply with any rule, practice direction or court order, the court will consider the circumstances of the case, so as to enable it to deal justly with the application including the need – (a) for litigation to be conducted efficiently and at proportionate cost; and (b) to enforce compliance with rules, practice directions and court orders."  Lord Justice Jackson commented that after 1st April 2013, “litigants who substantially disregard court orders or the requirements of the Civil Procedure Rules will receive significantly less indulgence than hitherto”.  

Claim dismissed - but do appeal!

The unfortunate Ms Drysdale was injured on the first day of her tenancy when she was ascending the steps to the property she had rented. She fell on the middle of three steps which had been painted red by the landlady to improve their appearance. There was a low wall (9.5 cm) next to the steps and a 2.5 metre (8 feet) drop on the other side of the wall. Ms Drysdale fell over the wall and was seriously injured. The judge in Drysdale v Joanne Hedges (27th July 2012, Unreported) found that the drop was dangerous and a reasonable landlord ought to have raised the wall or provided a guardrail. He also found that the paint increased the slipperiness of the steps. Nonetheless he dismissed the claim commenting that he had considerable sympathy for Ms Drysdale but that her remedy could only be in another court. The judgment provides an interesting analysis of what duties are owed by a landlord to a tenant for personal injury and in what circumstances. The case was brought under the Occupiers’ Liability Act 1957 (‘OLA’), the Defective Premises Act 1972 (‘DPA’) and at common law. The judge considered that the OLA did not apply: at the time of the accident the tenancy and occupation had commenced. He held that parliament could not have intended s. 4 of the ‘DPA’ and s. 2 of the OLA both to define a landlord’s duty. In fact s. 4 of the DPA replaced s.4 OLA. The judge turned to s. 4 of the DPA. He noted that in order to show a breach of the tenancy agreement and s. 4 Ms Drysdale had to show the premises were ‘not in good repair’. The judge cited Alker v Collingwood[2007] 1 W.L.R. 2230 in which a claimant had argued that a glass panel in a door in rented premises was dangerous because it did not contain safety glass. Carnworth L.J. said that a duty to repair could not be equated with a duty to make safe. You could let out a house with a very steep stairway with no railings but s. 4 does not require you to make safe such a dangerous feature. The judge also referred to Quick v Taff Ely Borough Council [1986] QB 809 in which Lawton LJ said ‘a tenant must take the house as he finds it; neither a landlord nor a tenant is bound to provide the other with a better house than there was to start with’. Applying all of this the judge found that although the drop from the middle step to the basement was dangerous, it was not out of repair; the drop from the steps would not have been unusual at the time the house was built. He also concluded that the steps were not actually out of repair. Accordingly there was no breach of section 4. The judge then turned to the common law. He observed that Cavalier v Pope [1906] AC 428 decided that a landlord who lets premises in a dangerous condition owes no duty to remedy the defect and no duty of care to a third party injured as a result of the defect. That decision had been criticised and attempts had been made to limit its effect. The claimant in Lips v Older [2005] PIQR P14 suffered a similar accident to Ms Drysdale. He was successful but Cavalier v Pope was not mentioned. It was also not mentioned in Sowerby v Charlton [2006] 1 WLR 568 by the Court of Appeal. That case also involved similar facts but the case was about admission of liability and whether a judgment should be set aside and not whether such a common law duty was owed. The judge concluded that Sowerby did not bind him. In the end the judge took the view that he was bound by Cavalier so far as the unguarded drop was concerned and that the landlady had no duty to guard it. However he did consider that she owed a duty to take reasonable care to ensure that the application of the paint did not create an unnecessary risk of injury. Without such a duty a landlord would have carte blanche to act with impunity and create dangers which would not be caught by the 1972 Act. Even though he found there was a duty in relation to the steps and that the presence of the paint unnecessarily increased the risk, he did not find a breach. A knowledgeable person might have known that the B & Q paint would have increased the risk but not the ordinary man on the street. Accordingly it could not be said that the landlady had failed to take reasonable care. So, no duty under the Occupiers’ Liability Act where section 4 of the DPA applies. No breach of duty under section 4 of the DPA where there is no disrepair. No duty is owed at common law by a landlord who lets premises in a dangerous condition (Cavalier is still good law) but a landlord owes a duty to take reasonable care not to create an unnecessary risk of injury. It is not clear whether the Claimant will appeal – watch this space!

A Tale of Two Countries: applicable law in a claim against a foreign (French) insurer

Kira Middleton v Allianz IARD SA v Erika Lee Middleton [2012] EWHC 2287 (QB)     This matter arose out of a road traffic accident in France on 6 February 2002. The Claimant was a child born on 28 September 1999. The Defendant was an insurance company registered in France. The Third Party was the Claimant’s mother and became a party to the proceedings when a Part 20 (additional) claim was brought against her by the Defendant. The Claimant and the Third Party were British nationals. On 6 February 2002 they were in France; the Claimant lived there with her mother at the time (in the house of her grandmother near Bergerac, France).  A family friend (also a British national), was visiting the home of the Claimant’s grandmother. The friend was driving a Renault Espace vehicle and reversed at a time when the Claimant was behind her. The Claimant was struck and knocked to the ground by the reversing vehicle. The Claimant suffered a very significant brain injury, together with other injuries of the utmost seriousness. The Claimant was in a coma for 4 weeks. She was left with very significant care, medical, physiotherapy and accommodation/equipment needs. In the period since the accident the Claimant and her mother had returned to England where the Claimant was, by the time she issued proceedings, domiciled. It was common ground that the Claimant was entitled to bring proceedings directly against the French-registered insurer in the English Courts (being the Courts of the Claimant’s domicile) by virtue of section 3 of EU (Council) Regulation 44/2001 and the decision of the European Court of Justice in FBTO Schadeverzekeringen NV v Jack Odenbreit ECJ 13 December 2007 [2007] EUECJ C-463/06. The issue in the case concerned applicable law. The parties agreed that this issue was to be determined by reference to Part III of the Private International Law (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act 1995. The starting point was that French law – the lex loci delicti (the law of the place where the events constituting the tort occurred) – should be applied. However, the presumption that French law applied could be displaced where the Court was satisfied that it was, by reference to section 12 of the 1995 Act, “substantially more appropriate” to apply the law of another country in preference to the lex loci delicti.  The Claimant’s case was that French law, as the law of the place where the accident occurred, was applicable to the substantive issues in the claim and, by virtue of the same and the application of the French Loi Badinter, the liability of the tortfeasor (for which the Defendant was obliged to provide insurance indemnity) was strict. The effect of this would be that contribution from the Claimant’s mother would not be available. Unsurprisingly, the Third Party made common cause with the Claimant on this issue. The Defendant’s case was that it was substantially more appropriate that English law should be applied (in preference to French law). The question of the law applicable to the claim was tried as a preliminary issue by Griffith Williams J and a reserved judgment was handed down on 1 August 2012. The Claimant’s arguments prevailed and it was held that it was not substantially more appropriate to apply English law to the substantive issues in the case, including liability. Accordingly, French law applied (with the result that the Claimant would be able to rely on the Loi Badinter). The Judge applied the conventional three-stage process to the section 11/section 12 exercise in which stage one involves identifying the issue to which it is suggested the general (section 11) rule is not to be applied (for example, the issue of liability); stage two involves identifying the factors which connect the tort to the place where it happened (France) and the factors which connect the tort to the forum (England); and, stage three requires an assessment of the significance of these factors (as they connect the tort to each jurisdiction) to determine whether section 12 should be applied (see, Roerig v Valiant [2002] 1 WLR 2304 (CA)). The Claimant, her mother (the Third Party) and their wider family had a longstanding and significant connection with France (where they were living when the accident occurred) and, although they had moved back to England in the period since the accident, it is not surprising that their connection with France persuaded the Judge that it was not substantially more appropriate to apply English law. The significance of the decision lies in the Judge’s rejection of the following (somewhat novel) arguments advanced by the Defendant at trial. First, the Judge was not persuaded that the coincidence in the nationality of the Claimant, her Mother (Third Party) and tortfeasor should be given greater weight than the domicile of these parties – and the French insurer – at the time that the accident occurred (ie. they were all domiciled in France). It had been argued for the Defendant that nationality was a more stable feature than domicile (which could, as here, change over time) and so should be given proportionately greater weight. This argument did not succeed and represents, perhaps, a more or less subtle change of emphasis from the approach taken in Edmunds v Simmonds [2001] 1 WLR 1003 (QBD) (where the country of registration of the insurer was accorded less weight) and Harding v Wealands [2005] 1 WLR 1539 (CA) where, in the Court of Appeal (before the case was appealed on a different issue to the House of Lords), nationality of the tortfeasor was given considerable weight as a material factor. Second, the Judge was similarly unpersuaded that it was more appropriate for English law to be applied because, as a result of English authority (Harding Wealands [2007] 2 AC 1 (HL(E)), the Claimant’s damages would be assessed according to English law in any event because such assessment is governed by the law of the forum even where foreign law applies to the substantive issues (the Defendant had pointed out that, at odds with the conventional approach in continental legal systems, the English common law permitted different issues to be determined by the law of different jurisdictions and also recognised a distinction between the substantive issues (determined by the applicable law of the tort) and the procedural (determined by the law of the forum)). It was held, rejecting the Defendant’s argument, that the accident occurred in France where the Loi Badinter would apply and, by implication, the injured party (and insurer) would have a reasonable expectation that the Claimant would take advantage of this – a view that was consistent with interim payments and correspondence from the Defendant insurer which, contrary to its stance in the preliminary issue, had initially proceeded on the basis that the French Loi Badinter would apply (the Judge’s conclusions in this regard represent a departure from the approach taken in Dawson & Dawson v Broughton (2007) 151 Sol J 1167). This is, perhaps, one of the last cases where applicable law will be determined by reference to Part III of the Private International Law (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act 1995. Accidents which post-date 11 January 2009 are now dealt with by reference to the rather different considerations of the Rome II Regulation on applicable law (see, European Parliament and Council Regulation (864/2007) on the Law Applicable to Non-contractual Obligations).

Definitely a good walk spoiled: Hammersley-Gonsalves (A child by his litigation friend T Gonsalves) v Redcar & Cleveland BC

Some things simply make one feel old: the 90s revival, being older than your doctor, complaining about people playing music on public transport.  To this (abridged) list I can now add school games lessons.  Back in my day (a phrase that can be added to the aforementioned list) school sport largely consisted of being cold and taking part in team games in the winter (good character building stuff no doubt) or in the summer, a bit of cricket and then pretending that anyone cared about athletics.    What wasn’t contemplated was teaching the pupils how to play golf, and if Hammersley-Gonsalves (A child by his litigation friend T Gonsalves) v Redcar & Cleveland BC is anything to go by, a very wise policy that was indeed.  The decision in Hammersley-Gonsalves has just been handed down by the Court of Appeal.  The Claimant, who at the time of the accident was almost twelve years old, was being taught golf at his secondary school.  The school had given 22 boys six indoor golf lessons.  For the seventh lesson, the enterprising PE teacher had created a golf course in the school grounds. Quite properly, the teacher taking the lesson had told the pupils, who each had one club and one ball, not to use their club or hit anything until instructed to do so.  The pupils walked out onto the school grounds in single file.  However, boys being boys, one of the children decided to disregard the instruction and when having reached the school field, put his ball down and took a swing. Unfortunately, this resulted in C being hit in the face by the golf club.  Equally unfortunately, this not being a proper golf club, there wasn’t a collection of doctors in the club house bar. The Claimant succeed at first instance, with the judge finding that  the teacher could not see what the pupils were doing, and that he did not see the pupil swing the club that hit the Claimant.  As such, it was held that the lesson had not been adequately supervised and consequently that the Defendant local authority had not met the appropriate standard of care. The Court of Appeal had no trouble with the judge’s finding that the teacher could not see every pupil at every moment.  However, it was difficult to see how the Claimant could succeed absent an allegation relating to staffing ratios.  It was obvious to the Court of Appeal that one teacher could not be expected to see every action of 22 boys when walking in single file, however, on the judge’s finding a lack of adequate supervision was not made out. There had been no history of bad behaviour and the action of the careless young golfer was unexpected. Although the question of appropriate staffing ratios had not been argued, in the cricumstances closer and additional supervision was not required given the age of the children and the nature of the activity.  Also, even if the teacher had been negligent in not observing the boy swinging the club, it also had to be established that that failure was causative of the Claimant’s injuries.  The judge had not dealt with this and there was no finding that on a balance of probabilities any action by the teacher would have prevented the accident.All in all it would have been far better to stick with football.